All About Ashwagandha

Let’s talk about ashwagandha!

Withania somnifera, or, Ashwagandha, is an adaptogenic herb. What is an adaptogen? In simple terms, adaptogens help your body adapt and respond well to stress. Also known as Indian ginseng or winter cherry, ashwagandha offers unique health benefits.

Ashwagandha is only one of many adaptogens! There are many other types of adaptogens, such as the ones listed below…

  • Holy basil
  • Maca
  • Reishi
  • Bacopa
  • Ginseng
  • Gotu Kola

This is not an exhaustive list by any means – there are many different adaptogenic herbs and plants and mushrooms that offer their own benefits. There are various adaptogens for different uses. Some target acute stress, while others target chronic, long-term stress. There are also others that strengthen immune health.

So what does ashwagandha do? Some of the benefits attributed to ashwagandha include antioxidant, anti-stress, antitumor, and anti-inflammatory properties. It is used for anxiety, to reduce the physiological effects of stress, and to improve wellbeing.  Ashwagandha is an adaptogen that targets chronic or long-term stress. Although it won’t remove the stress from your life, it can improve your body’s capacity to deal with it and thus influence your mood and energy levels.

Ashwagandha contains something called withanolides. Withanolides are what gives ashwagandha its effectiveness. Withaferin A, a withanolide from ashwagandha, is thought to be the substance that gives the plant its anti-cancerous, antioxidant, and anti-angiogenesis properties. Withaferin A has been the subject of multiple studies researching its effects. It has been shown to inhibit cell growth in breast cancer as well as to relieve fatigue and toxicity from chemotherapy treatments.

Perhaps you want to try this adaptogenic herb! As with any supplement, sourcing and dosage is very important. Feel free to discuss this with Dr. Barton at Nutrition 16:24, or with your medical professional.

If you wish to supplement with ashwagandha, there are multiple ways to do so!
Tea

There are adaptogen teas being offered that may be a good option for you. If you are a tea lover, you might consider this. If tea is just not your thing, read on.

Powdered Ashwagandha

This is a great flexible option to add ashwagandha to your diet. You can add it to your smoothies, oatmeal, yogurt, or any food you wish. Start with small amounts at first before adding more.

Liquid

Ashwagandha is also available in liquid form. MediHerb offers ashwagandha in liquid form, with standardized amounts of withanolides. Nutrition 16:24 also provides elixirs which contain ashwagandha. We also have other forms of ashwagandha available. Inquire with our office if you would like to learn more about this.

Pill Form

For those who don’t mind swallowing an extra pill, this is a very easy way to supplement with this adaptogen. 

Again, if you are out shopping for ashwagandha, be careful in selecting your supplement. Make sure the quality is excellent and check the active ingredients to make sure there are withanolides. If you want to be sure that your ashwagandha is well sourced and of excellent quality, we invite you to purchase from our office. Nutrition 16:24 offers ashwagandha in different forms. Email our office or call us to learn more and to order if you are interested.

The holiday season is upon us, and along with that comes stress. Whether or not you choose to supplement with ashwagandha, we encourage you to be filling your body with good, clean sources of proteins, carbohydrates, and vegetables. Whatever the holiday season brings for you, we hope you are able to experience some peace and joy among the chaos and stress.

Learn More…

https://drinkmetta.com/blogs/the-elevated-life/the-ultimate-guide-to-adaptogens#:~:text=Adaptogens%20are%20a%20select%20group,physical%2C%20chemical%20or%20biological%20needs
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/10956379/
https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/neuroscience/withanolide
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780123964922000187
https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/neuroscience/withaferin-a
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780128146194000100
Principles and Practice of Phytotherapy, 2nd Ed. Kerry Bone & Simon Mills.

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